Masi – Iconic Italian Wine Company Collaborates with Famed Canadian Artist

Masi Agricola commissions Susan A. Point to create custom wine label on Costasera Amarone 2000

A family-owned winery by the Boscaini family and now in its seventh generation, Masi Agricola (Masi), makers of quality Amarone wines in Valpolicella, has commissioned renowned Coast Salish artist Susan A. Point to create a piece of art, which will be featured on a label of Masi Costasera Amarone 2000 for a special Masi Costasera Contemporary Art Project. Only 112 bottles featuring the art will be available in British Columbia (BC).
Amarone is a wine made in the Veneto using the ancient indigenous grape varieties Corvina, Rondinella and Molinara that are partially dried using a process called Appassimento. Since the 18th Century, the Boscaini family’s expertise in the Appassimento winemaking technique earned Masi the title of a global leader in the production of Amarone and placed the Masi Amarone as an icon of Italian excellence. To celebrate the decades of expertise and cultural heritage passed down from generations, Masi created the Masi Costasera Contemporary Art Project. Every two years an internationally-famous artist is chosen to create an art piece which is in turn adapted to a label of the iconic Masi wine, Costasera Amarone. Each label becomes an expression of the artist’s interpretation of the wine and its history, culture, and tradition.
Like art, culture and wine are constantly evolving; the history, tradition, and innovation that shape life in Northeast Italy is often summarized by those living there as Venetian Values. These values shape the essence of the Masi Costasera Contemporary Art Project. The benefactor of the project, the Masi Foundation, extends these values into cultural initiatives. Proceeds from sales of the Costasera Amarone 2000 will be offered as a Masi study bursary and Susan A. Point will select a young art student to further his/her artistic experience in conjunction with Masi.
Coast Salish Art is an artistic movement inspired by the history, traditions, and symbols of the Musqueam people, who have lived for more than ten thousand years on the West Coast of Canada.
For the latest, third edition of Contemporary Art, Susan A. Point, renowned Musqueam Coast Salish artist from Canada, created a piece of art called Traditional Legacy. The piece depicts traditional subjects, represented by the artist using pictograms that range from abstract to figurative – an embodiment of the Artist’s own journey that led her from the Pacific North-West towards Valpolicella.
The limited edition of the Masi Costasera Amarone 2000 featuring this art will be available at select BC Liquor Stores in May 2018.
About Masi Agricola:
Family-owned and deeply rooted in the Valpolicella Classica region, Masi Agricola (Masi) makes premium wines using grapes and methods that are indigenous to the region and constant technological updates. Masi has recognised expertise in the Appassimento technique and leads in the production of Amarone. Masi has been owned by the Boscaini family since the end of the XVII century and for seven generations, it continues to produce quality Italian wines that celebrate the culture, history and expertise of its people, land and wine. Learn more: www.masi.it/eng 
About Susan A. Point:
Susan A. Point, O.C., DFA., RCA., D.Litt is an internationally recognized Coast Salish artist, descending from the Musqueam peoples. When Susan became interested in Coast Salish art in the early 1980s, there had been little research done on the style, which led her to teach herself. Since then, her work has helped revive Coast Salish design, shedding light on the traditions and stories of First Nation peoples that may have otherwise been forgotten. In addition to receiving the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal upon accepting The Order of Canada, Susan has been recognized as one of B.C.’s 100 most influential women, one of Vancouver’s 2012 Remarkable Women, amongst many other distinctions, awards, and honours. Susan’s works can be seen at the Vancouver International Airport, Stanley Park, the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., the UBC Museum of Anthropology, and throughout the cities of Seattle and Vancouver.

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